Montford Inn-Client Launch Portfolio

10 Client Tools for the Montford Inn

Sarah Smallwood

            The following tools were created for the Montford Inn with the goal of helping the inn showcase its luxury, comfort, and romantic southern touch. The tools are intended to show this through graphic design details and effective wording. The tools include building blocks for news releases and a feature pitch, as well as an outline for a speech which might be used to introduce the spa services which are still in the works at the inn. The speech is accompanied by eight potential slide ideas which would accompany its delivery.

            I have also included four photos with captions. These photos might be used on social media pages for various reasons, whether it be to have content to post and attract website visitors, or to showcase other details of the inn, adding to the photo gallery for guests to look at. The infographic is intended for social media use, as it gives potential guests the feeling of romantic comfort while highlighting the small details the Montford Inn strives to provide for each guest.

            I have designed two new possible logos to be used on business cards and in letterheads. The logos are simple enough to be converted into the black and white format as well. I attempted to portray the inn as a modern place to stay, while giving the feeling of prairie romance. The logos are also simple and eye catching.

            The last tools consist of a brochure and business card. I wanted to incorporate the use of color theory into these two objects. Therefore, I carried a splash of purple on both sides of the business card, which hopefully invokes feelings of delicate romance. I also intended for the information of the business card to be slightly compartmentalized on the back, making it easier to read for guests. For the brochure, my goal was to lure guests into the inn without flooding the pamphlet with too many photos, while also designing it to be clean and simple yet elegant. The use of a pale olive green gives the inn an inviting, homey feel, while the photos show the luxury and upscale amenities.

 

  1. Brand Story

Like a wildflower speckling the prairie, the Montford Inn has been spot of romance and comfort in Norman, Oklahoma since it was built in 1994. Ron and Phyllis Murray founded the inn to provide visitors with the comfort and welcome of the south, and so far, they have been successful. For over 20 years, the Montford Inn has been a sophisticated jewel of a bed in breakfast. Since it’s beginning, the inn has drawn the attention of acclaimed guests and dignitaries, from celebrities and movie producers, to professors and politicians.

With time, the inn has grown, adding rooms, cottages and services. It has continued to gain recognition for all the small details which create the atmosphere guests desire. Antique and one-of-a-kind decorations line the walls and rooms, cookies are always baking, wine glasses are filled, the gardens bloom, all coming together to create an experience that no hotel can offer. The inn offers various ways to serve guests, including hosting family reunions, weddings, and more.

The ownership of the inn has changed over the decades, with the inn now being run by the founder’s son, William Murray. Montford Inn remains a family-run establishment, and it still strives to welcome each guest with the same hospitality and comfort as the beginning. With the addition of cottages, each containing fireplaces and couple’s jacuzzies, the inn has begun to attract more and more honeymooners and lovebirds. The Montford Inn plans to expand this aspect of service, hoping to provide touching amenities and a romantic experience for visitors.

 

 

 

  1. 4 Photos with Captions

 

Hidden Hollow, a quaint, private cottage, includes many romantic amenities, including a heart-shaped couple’s jacuzzi tub.

The details in Hidden Hollow, one of the Montford Inn’s many cottages, leave visitors feeling like they have spent a romantic week in a prairie get-away.

Homesteaders, one of the many rooms available at Montford Inn, features small details and photos from the past, creating a nostalgic atmosphere for visitors.

The Montford Inn stands like a jewel on the prairie during a peaceful Oklahoma spring evening.

Warm light bounces off the teal walls of Morningsong, a peaceful room which rests in the corner of the inn, offering guests many windows and an abundance of natural light.

The teal walls and abundance of windows combine to create a relaxing glow in Morningsong, a corner room available at Montford Inn.

 

 

 

  1. Logo

Logo 1

Logo 2

 

 

  1. Infographic

 

 

  1. News Release

To be sent to:

Visit OKC- Tabbi Burwell

tburwell@visitokc.com

Communications Manager

Oklahoma City Convention & Visitors Bureau

(405) 297-8973

 

NORMAN, Okla. — The Montford Inn in Norman has announced plans to implement a selection of spa services to their bed and breakfast. The owners intend to provide a multitude of services to their guests, including massages and skin therapies.

The spa would be a romantic addition to the ten bedrooms and six cottages currently available to guests. The innkeepers provide a variety of room services, including stocking rooms with amenities, delivering food orders and insuring the guests’ needs are met. Breakfast is homemade and served every morning, and complimentary wine and cookies are laid out during business hours. Some of the guest rooms feature couples’ bathtubs, including one room with a private hot tub. Cottages adjacent from the inn provide a more secluded option for guests wanting more privacy or a romantic escape.  However, the Montford Inn owners are eager to upgrade the guest experience.

“We want to renovate one of the older upstairs bedrooms to create the spa area,” says Phyllis Murray, a co-founder of the inn. “Our goal is to offer guests and couples yet another way to escape from the stresses of everyday life.”

The Montford Inn was founded in 1999 by Murray and her late husband, William, and was designed to combine a sophisticated atmosphere with the unmatched comforts of a bed and breakfast. Guests stay at the inn for romantic getaways, business meetings, family reunions, or an escape from busy city-life. A stay at the inn is filled with personal touches that no hotel chain can offer.

The inn owners can be reached in person at the inn every week day until 2pm or contacted by phone at 405-321-2200. Interviews are best scheduled a few days in advance. Photos of the inn and rooms are available on the inn’s website, though the owners are open to new photo and video opportunities.

 

 

  1. E-Mail Pitch

Mark Codner: Editor for The Edmond Sun

mcodner@edmondsun.com

http://www.edmondsun.com/opinion/codner-supporting-transportation-by-train/article_a658e546-4d62-11e7-be42-f7f937b20db0.html

Dear Mr. Codner,

The Oklahoma City area is sprawling with growth, and the nation’s eyes are regularly being drawn to our region by our exciting features, such the Oklahoma City Thunder and the successful University of Oklahoma Sooners football program. However, there is a bed and breakfast just south of OKC, in Norman, which continually attracts prominent guests, from celebrities, to dignitaries visiting with business with the university. I would love to help draw attention to that inn.

The Montford Inn has a rich history of guests and a deep connection to Norman. If you have the time, I would like to arrange a meeting between you and the owners of the inn, so they can give you more details about the guests they’ve had. This would make an interesting story which would showcase the entertainment appeal of the Oklahoma City area, showing Oklahoma residents and on-lookers another taste of what we have to offer.

If you have any questions about the inn or scheduling an interview, please let me know. I look forward to further discussing this story with you!

Regards,

–Sarah Smallwood

Public Relations Student

University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism

Smallwood.SarahM@gmail.com

 

 

 

  1. Special Event Speech

Good afternoon everyone, it’s wonderful to see you here today. My name is William Murray, I have the pleasure of managing the Montford Inn with my wife and mother. I first want to thank you all for visiting us today to attend the grand opening of the spa services here at the Montford Inn. Our Montford Inn family has been anxiously awaiting this day for months!

This would not be possible without my mother, Phyllis Murray, who has worked tirelessly to run the inn and plan these new services. Phyllis custom-built the inn with my late father, Ron, in 1994, and has over-seen this jewel on the prairie ever since. Without her guidance, perseverance and leadership, the inn would not have been able to serve Norman these last two decades. She continues to work hard every day at the inn, making sure guests are feeling welcome and everyone’s needs are met.

Our family built the inn in order to provide a premier bed and breakfast experience to guests, and we are over-whelmed with joy to be adding to these experiences. The Montford Inn strives to offer a luxurious yet comfortable stay for the business traveler, or a romantic, prairie get-away for the honey-mooning couple. The inclusion of spa services at Montford Inn will continue these efforts, offering the chance for a small weekend trip to turn into two days of relaxation and pampering.

We are excited to offer guests an assortment of relaxing new options. The spa will include massages, pampering body scrubs, luxury baths, and soothing facials. These services will accompany the lovely touches already offered at the inn, which include couple’s hot tubs, complimentary wine, and daily homemade breakfast, among other things.

We are thankful for the many visitors who have chosen the Montford Inn as their bed and breakfast over the last 24 years of business. The years have been filled with joy and fulfillment, and we look forward to offering these new services to guests who visit our home.

Thank you again for coming today. Please enjoy the spa services and come stay with us again soon.

 

 

 

  1. Slide Deck

Slide 1

Slide 2 OR

 

Slide 3

Slide 4

Slide 5

Slide 6

Slide 7

Slide 8

 

  1. Brochure

 

  1. Business Card

It Might Be Too Good To Be True

Social Media Sites Can Facilitate the Spread of False Information– Image courtesy of NPR

We live in a time when the President of the United States can instantly deliver a message to almost 50 million viewers using Twitter, news agencies race each other to see who can break news faster, regardless of the validity, and false claims can go viral and wreak havoc in a matter of minutes. This haphazardness of news and information has led to an era in which it is some how not that strange for public leaders to be arguing about the subjectivity of facts.

This is why it was a relief to read about a team of astronomers from Arizona State University and MIT which spent two years double-checking data which would indicate a huge scientific discovery. It was shocking to me that the team’s immediate reaction was not excitement, but skepticism.

Skepticism, in my opinion, ought to be anyone’s first reaction to news, especially news which is surprising or currently breaking. Because of platforms like social media, where information is reproduced and spread at lightning-fast rates, a dangerous climate has formed of click-bait articles and misleading titles. It has even recently been discovered that on Twitter, false news spreads faster than true news.

Because of this, it is paramount to the success of the modern public relations professional to fact-check and research before relaying information to the public. Ironically, in this day and age, the back lash for being exposed for spreading false information tends to be extremely harsh.

As the team of researchers proved with its extensive fact-checking, true news can still be exciting. When thinking ahead to how I might ensure my client is informative as well as entertaining, there are a few strategies that come to mind. One of them is to lower the frequency of news, as conserving news releases may preserve the luster and excitement of the news itself. Furthermore, there are tactics that I can adopt such as using info graphics and social media tools to remain compelling.

While public relations professionals need to respond quickly, the truth is more important than a race for ‘shares’ and ‘likes’.

An Analysis of H&M’s Garment Scandal and Apology

Screenshot of H&M’s Scandalous Product from USA Today

In early Jan. 2018, the global clothing company H&M released a young boy’s hoodie which read, “The Coolest Monkey in the Jungle”, modeled on a young African American boy. The clothing ad immediately caused wide-spread backlash on the internet, as well as store protests and online boycotts.

H&M released an apology in response to the issue, explaining that the racist undertones were accidental and a consequence of negligence, not intentional discrimination.

After reading the apology statement, my initial thoughts are drawn to the crisis management tactics they employed. The company acknowledged the central faults with the ad while also defending the company in a, in my opinion, tasteful manner. It is clear that H&M wants the public to not only know they are sorry, but also that the incident was purely accidental. However, the company also acknowledges that accidental racism is still racism, and that future steps will be taken to prevent incidents such as this.

H&M has a page dedicated to the apology, has removed the ad from the internet and the hoodie from the market, and has hired a diversity manager to oversee operations and advise. Because of these things, I am inclined to feel that H&M is being sincere with both their apology, and the actions the company is taking to back-up the apology.

Before this assignment, I was aware of the scandal, but as unaware of the official apology and the actions H&M has taken to repair the situation. After researching the issue, I now feel more positively towards H&M and am interested to see what the company does in the future as it continues to operate in today’s social climate which is focused heavily on present-day institutional racism and discrimination

 

 

media convergence & its effect on the consumer

People talk about the way media is changing like it’s the end of the world. We talk about how newspaper circulation rates are dwindling, how the 24-hour TV news cycle is ruining the integrity of the information the media gives us, how no one listens to the radio anymore–and all of these issues hold varying degrees of truth, but media convergence doesn’t mean the end of media as we know it. What media convergence does mean is innovation and a whole lot of opportunity.

Newspapers, television and radio have been around for ages. They’ve evolved and changed over the years to better suit their readers, viewers and listeners. When the Internet sprang up, they kept evolving and changing, perhaps a little timidly. Now, with the advent of social media and personal blogging platforms, we have so many options and outlets to stay informed as well as voice our own opinions. Before the Internet, news was largely a one-way street. Newspapers printed what they wanted to say with little interaction from their readers–maybe a letter to the editor or two, but newspapers weren’t about being a conversation. With social media as well as online news platforms, consumers (readers, viewers, etc.) can interact with their news in a new way. Consumers can tweet at the media organizations that deliver their news, offering commentary, praise, criticism–whatever they’d like to say. They can leave (often inflammatory) Facebook comments on links to stories. And, on websites like Medium, anyone can write their own pieces to be published and distributed on the web, covering a variety of topics.

Because new media (as opposed to traditional media) is so widely accessible to a broad audience, it can give more people platforms to have their voices heard. In a way, media convergence affects the consumer by making the consumer, in some way, part of the media. Because we do have access to the Internet and because many once-traditional media outlets are adopting a more online-friendly, digital component to their publications and broadcasts, we get news in a much more personalized, interactive manner. We can get mobile news alerts on our phones, we can like and follow pages and Twitter accounts for news organizations that we enjoy–we tailor our media consumption to our own preferences, and we can interact with those organizations. Media convergence has allowed for a conversation between the consumer and the producers, creating a more interactive experience for us as media consumers.

privacy on the internet: it’s an exchange

I like to think of privacy as an exchange–a transaction, if you will. Like exchanging a handful of quarters for a soda from the vending machine, you exchange your privacy for some convenience or information on the internet.

If you want privacy, you have to be willing to give something up–information, convenience, whatever. So while I’m conscious of the image that I give off through social media, the information about myself that I put out on the Internet, and even the cookies that websites use to track my activity, I’m not overly worried.

I don’t mind sharing information about myself on the Internet. It’s what I’m doing right now, and it’s what I do every time I use Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. I publish my work to the web regularly for The Oklahoma Daily, and I publish my work to my photography portfolio and blog website. In some cases, I want people to see what I’m doing. I want people to see my photography and my work for The Daily,  so I give up some privacy. I want people to see my stories on social media, so I keep my account privacy relatively lax, allowing plenty of people to see what I’m up to. I’m careful about it, of course, but I make a conscious decision to give up my privacy when I’m using the Internet.

Of course, there’s a lot more going on behind the scenes when I’m using social media or even sending an email. As a Gmail user, I know keywords from my email correspondence are picked up and shot off to advertisers, and I know it because when I open emails from my Poem-a-Day newsletter, the ads on the side read “Publish your poetry now!” and “Self publish a book now!” And while I’m not particularly interested in publishing poetry or a book, it’s not overly bothersome to me. I love Gmail. Would I love it more if it wasn’t scanning my emails for advertising buzzwords? Maybe a little. But Gmail is a free service, so I exchange some of my privacy for an email service that doesn’t let lots of spam into my inbox and that works nicely on a lot of devices.

I know that websites track my activity with cookies, too, and I know it because if I’m looking at sweaters online (which, as it so happens, I often do), ads I see on other websites encourage me to buy those very same sweaters or consider different brands of sweaters. This exchange of privacy might seem more malicious because I’m never agreeing to a terms of service upfront when I get to an online store, and I don’t know what other information is being tracked about my Internet use. Still, I’m exchanging some privacy for the convenience of shopping online.

While Internet tracking can quickly go from harmless to sinister, we make a conscious decision to use the Internet to make our lives easier. If Internet services overstep their boundaries in terms of what we’re willing to share with them, we’ll take a stand, and they’ll step back. As long as we’re conscious of how we’re using the Internet and what information we’re divulging about ourselves online, the Internet and all it has to offer can be fabulously useful.