My Bathroom as a Design Study

There are many aspects of design which companies use to market products, including variations of color, typography, balance, minimalism and use of space, proportion, and many more. For Public Relations Publications, I was asked to look in the world around me for examples of objects, ads, designs and other things which illustrate the many concepts of design.

Being that my collection of beauty products is nearly the size of a small shop, I wanted to turn to my bathroom to look for examples of design that I am exposed to every day. The products I chose to analyze all cater to very specific audiences, and that is apparent in the design of the product containers. It was also interesting to me to compare the theme of designs with the cost of the item.

The first product I decided to analyze was an instant tanning spray made by L’Oréal. The most obvious design element being used is the color of this bottle, a metallic bronze. When looking at the section of tanning products in a local drug store, they all tend to follow a general theme of brown and bronze colors. To a consumer, these products are immediately distinguishable as tanning products, even from afar. It is worth noting that the name brands, such as L’Oréal, tend to have fancier packaging, being metallic and abstractly shaped, whereas the off brand products were simple, tan squeeze bottles.

This product is a floral-scented body wash from Bath & Bodyworks. I think that this bottle is a great example of a couple of design elements, including typography and dominance. Coupled with the blue and orange color scheme, the bottle literally screams beach at possible consumers. The large text creates an overwhelming beach feeling, making it appealing during winter months when shoppers are eager for warm vibes.

Furthermore, the designs on the bottle are textured, with the fish being slightly raised, and the background font shining a metallic gold.

This Burt’s Bees lotion serves as a good example of unity, when all of the design elements come together to create a whole image before the eyes are drawn to specific elements. At first glance, the bottle is light and inviting, in tune with the product being sold, which is a lotion marketed as having revitalizing properties to dry and damaged skin. Burt’s Bees used a combination of warm letters, a yellow background with a radiating design, and the clean center to create the overall appeal. 

This conditioner is marketed to a different audience than most of my other beauty products. Rather than a product intended to enhance general beauty, this product is for those who are frequently exposed to chlorine and want to protect their hair from the drying effects.

It uses color design elements to create a simple, clean look. It avoids design elements which indicate gender, and leans towards a practical use. The bottle achieves this clean look by using a lot of minimalist elements and negative space. The main things that take up space are the sans serif font and the illustration of the swimmer. To me, this appeals to a wide variety of consumers. 

For the last product, I chose a bottle which I personally believe fails in many aspects. The typography down the bottle is inconsistent, with three fonts being used for no obvious purpose. The logo symbol, which is supposed to make the brand pop, is a small, hard to read font, especially when placed on top of the dark background. The various light colors, used on the dark background, create no sense of balance, especially when placed next to the distracting pink floral shape in the left corner.

Overall, this bottle fails to use design elements in a way which would create balance and help send the message. The message of the bottle isn’t immediately clear, as one has to read closely to figure out the the product is a natural conditioner made for curly hair.