Mother of All Bombs – Afghanistan

On Friday, the 14th of April I awoke to news that the US military dropped its most powerful non-nuclear 11-ton bomb on eastern Afghanistan. The bomb targeted an ISIS cave and tunnel complex in Afghanistan and had a one-mile radius. The bombing caused great criticism and controversy from civilians in the United States. The bombing was to rid Afghanistan of militants who have sworn loyalty to ISIS which ultimately marked a dramatic change for the Trump Administration.

ISIS is a worldwide threat that needs to be stopped by any means necessary. ISIS has recruited thousands of motivated fighters who now cover thousands of square miles in Syria and all over the world. In my opinion, ISIS is barbaric and horrible. After reading many articles as well as watching videos over ISIS, I have honestly become terrified of what could happen within our world. It has become a war zone, and I am hoping that one day things will be different.

The most crazy part (well to me) about this is the fact that I had met the Ambassador of Afghanistan to the United States a few days before the bombing. You can read about my experience with the Ambassador in my older blog. But because of this, I have become more interested and involved with the relations between the United States/Afghanistan and how we plan to stop ISIS.


Semana Santa

Semana Santa is a holy week celebrated in every Christian country throughout the world even though each country that celebrates it has its own traditions to celebrate this religious week. Specifically, in the post I will be talking about the traditions of Semana Santa in my home country of El Salvador which was celebrated April 9th through the 15th.

This by far is my favorite holiday to celebrate, mostly because of the traditions my family has as well as the traditions that are done in El Salvador. My country is well known for its street carpets or “alfombras” made of colorful flowers and colored sawdust that are created on the street. In the town of Concepción de Ataco, my family gets together and makes delicate street carpets which portray creativity and spirituality. Families work in teams, and by the time they are finished the entire town is filled with beautiful street carpets. The making of these street carpets represent one of the greatest traditions for the Roman Catholic Church, especially because entire streets all over the country are closed for this religious holiday. After the street rugs are made, it is used as a path for a holy funeral procession, which further symbolizes the dead body of Christ. There is an unbelievable amount of work and effort put into these rugs, and families spend there time together in order to finish them and do their part.

Even if some people do not participate in the making of the street carpets, civilians from all over El Salvador come outside on Good Friday to see the beautiful rugs and take pictures of them. They truly are a work of art.

Although I was not able to be there this year for Semana Santa because of school , I celebrated Easter with my family in Texas – but I did receive pictures of the street carpets that were created by my family members (pictured below),